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Best Time To Go
October - March

Places Nearby Udaipur

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Ahar 2 Km
Is an impressive cluster of cenotaphs of the Maharanas of Mewar. There are about nineteen cenotaphs of Maharanas cremated there. The most striking cenotaph is that Maharana Amar Singh, who reigned from 1597 to 1620. Nearby is also Ahar Museum, where on display is limited but very rare earthen pottery. Some sculptures and other archaeological finds. Some pieces date back to 1700 BC and a tenth century metal figure of Buddha is a special attraction.

Sajjangarh 
High on a hilltop just outside Udaipur lies this dramatic 18th century palace, with a breathtaking view of the Mewar countryside originally intended to be a towering five-story astronomical centre, it was later abandoned and used as a monsoon palace and hunting lodge. It was built by Maharana Sajjan Singh to house and observatory and was planned as a nineteen-storied structure. However the Maharana died prematurely & the plans were curtailed. The now derelict palace dominates the skyline 2468 feet high on top of Bansdara Mountain. It is visible from a great distance & affords splendid scenic views.

Ghanerao 
Is a small town famous for its castle now converted into a hotel. The castle's highlight in the pavilion in the central court, where the musicians would perform, Also near the castle is the cenotaphs of former rulers. Mahavir Temple, a Jain Temple is also one of the highlights of the town

Kumbalgarh Fort 64 Km
Kumbalgarh is the second most important citadel after Chittorgarh in the Mewar region. Cradled in the Aravali Ranges the fort was built in the 15th century by Rana Kumbha. Because of its inaccessibility and hostile topography the fort had remained un-conquered. It also served the rulers of Mewar as a refuge in times of strife. The fort also served as refuge to the baby king Udai of Mewar. It is also of sentimental significance as it is the birthplace of Mewar's legendary King Maharana Partap.

The fort is self-contained and has within its amalgam almost everything to withstand a long siege. The fort fell only once that too to the combined armies of Mughal and of Amber for scarcity of drinking water. Many magnificent palaces an array of temples built by the Mauryas of which the most picturesque place is the Badal Mahal or the palace of the clouds. The fort also offers a superb birds view of the surroundings. The fort's thick wall stretches some 36 kms and is wide enough to take eight horses abreast. Maharana Fateh Singh renovated the fort in the 19th century. The fort's large compound has very interesting ruins and the walk around it can be very rewarding.

Kumbalgarh Wildlife Sanctuary
Kumbalgarh is located in the most rugged of the Aravali in Pali, Jaisamand & Udaipur districts of Rajasthan. It takes name after the impressive historic fort of Kumbalgarh, which come into view over the Park. It is 578 sq Kms in area and at an altitude of 500 to 1,300m. It is home to a very large variety of wild life, some of which are high   ly endangered species. The wild life includes wolf, leopards, sloth bear, hyena, jackal, jungle cat, sambhar, nilgai, chaisingh (the four horned antelope), chinkara and hare.
The bird life at Kumbhalgarh is also gratifying. The normally shy and untrusted grey jungle fowl can be spotted here. Peacocks and Doves can be sighted regularly feeding on grains scattered by the jungle guards. Bird like the red spur owls, Parakeets, golden Oriole, grey Pigeons, Bulbul, Dove and white breasted kingfisher can also be seen near the water holes.

Kumbalgarh natural beauty is attracting many tourists and especially for its accessibility from Udaipur, which is 100 Kms from here. Foot tracking and horse safari organized by local tour operators are proving to be very popular. A typical safari route enters the sanctuary from the Kumbhalgarh Fort and cutting across the sanctuary it reaches Ghanerao, and then borders an old abandoned road. On this road, one can sight Chinkaras, Neelgais, four horned Antelope and many birds. 

 

Chittaurgarh                 
Chittaurgarh is the epitome of Rajput pride, romance and spirit. It reverberates with history of heroism and sacrifice, which is evident as it echoes with the tales sung by the Bards of Rajasthan. The main reason for visiting Chittaurgarh is its massive hilltop fort, which is a depiction of Rajput culture and values. The fort stands on a 240-hectares site on a 180m high hill that rises rapidly from the plains below. 

Thrice a stronger enemy sacked Chittorgarh. The first sack occurred in 1303 when a Pathan King Ala-ud-din Khilji overwhelmed by the beauty of Queen Padmini besieged the fort in order to capture the regal beauty. In 1535 Bahadur Shah the Sultan of Gujarat besieged the fort causing immense carnage and it is said that 32000 men donned the saffron robes of martyrdom and rode out to face a certain death, and the women folkes committed Jauhar (an act of self-immolations by plunging in a large fire) led by Rani Karnawati.

In 1568 Mughal Emperor Akbar razed the fort to the rubble and once again the history repeated itself. In 1616 Mughal emperor Jehangir restored the fort to the Rajput but it was not resettled. Today a new township sprawls below the hill on the west side.

Haldighati 
The extensive terra firma, towards the south west of Nathdwara, this historical site witnessed the great legendry battle fought between Maharana Pratap and the Mughal Emperor -Akbar in 1576 AD.
The vast terrain that was supposedly covered with blood (the sand turned Red in colour) evokes a chill in the spine till date and envelopes a feel of nostalgia, this was the place where the heroic  Chetak  the gallant charger with his dedicated loyalty towards his chivalrous master (the Maharana Pratap) proved his worth by co-operating till his last breath. A 'Chhatri' with delicate white marble is dedicated both to the indomitable hero and his loyal charger, is noteworthy. A jeep drive to this place is rather interesting.

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