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Best Time To Go
October - March

Sightseeing in Ajmer

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Abdullah Khan’s Tomb: Near the railway station, this white tomb of the later Mughal period stands majestically. Abdullah Khan was the father of Hussain Ali Khan, the Minister of King Farrukh Siyar. The tomb was built in 1710 AD. Opposite this lies the tomb of Abdullah Khan’s wife, which, though small in size, is elegant in design and workmanship.

The Dargah: In the heart of the city is the tomb of Saint Khwaja Muin-ud-din Chishti, popularly known as Dargah Sharif, it has been since long a pilgrimage and spiritual center where followers of almost every creed and faith, Muslims and non-Muslims, come throughout the year, especially on the occasion of the annual ‘Urs’ celebrated from the 1st to 6th day of Islamic month of Rajab. The shrine of Khwaja Muin-ud-din Chishti is considered, today, a second Mecca/Medina for the Muslims of South Asia. The enormous gate of the mausoleum leading to the open court was built by Sultan Altamash (12th century). In the court are two gigantic iron cauldrons donated by the Mughal emperors. On the right is Akbar’s Mosque, a simple structure of dignified properties, made of white marble. On top of the inner gate huge drums are kept in the Naubat Ghar or drum house. The inner gate was donated by a Nawab of Hyderabad. Several tombs are located in the inner enclosure.

Ana Sagar: It is a beautiful lake, built in the 12th century and named after Anjali Chauhan. The huge embankment erected with the people’s help is a fine example of the corporate life in Ajmer at that time. The Mughal emperor Shahjahan built the `Baradari’ or pavilions. A large number of migratory birds including flamingoes flock here during winter.

Shah Jehan’s Mosque: In a corner of the inner court is an elegant building. A long (30.5 meters) and narrow court with a low arcade in white marble, is delicately carved with trelliswork, it is the most beautiful of all the buildings within the Dargah precinct.

The Tomb of the Saint is in a square building of white marble with a large dome. It has two entrances. The front porch is covered with lamps and chandeliers donated by devotees.

Adhai-din-ka-Jhonpra or Two and a Half Day Shed: Beyond the Dargah, among narrow and crowded lanes is a remarkable early Islamic structure. It was originally a Sanskrit college, probably within a temple enclosure. In 1193 AD, Mohammed Ghori took over Ajmer, destroyed the college and from its ruins. Along with the remains of many nearby temples, hurriedly put together a mosque within two and a half days (Adhai-din). Pillars form at least thirty temples must have gone into the making of this elegant monument, a superb example of Indo-Islamic architecture. emains of a strongly built fort stand. One is rewarded by a fine view of the city, from the Taragarh fort.

The Museum: Akbar’s royal residence is bow the museum that has an excellent collection of Mughal and Rajput armour and some fine sculpture.

Mayo College: In the southeast of the city is one of India’s finest public schools, Mayo College. It was founded in 1875 AD, originally only for the sons of Rajput royalty. Each heir to a state built his own house within the spacious college grounds covering 81 hectares, which also housed his entire retinue along with his English tutor. The college is now open to all is run as a public school tradition.

The Circuit House: The former British Residency, overlooking Ana Sagar lake has been converted as the Circuit House. From here the finest view of the lake can be had. One can also se the cenotaph and shrine of the Arya Samaj movement in north India.

Jagat Pite Shri Brahma Mandir: The temple town of Pushkar is full of religious myths and faiths, and the temple of Lord Brahma- Lord Creation – is its biggest a attraction. This is the only existing temple dedicated to Lord Brahma. It was constructed in the 14th century and stands on a high plinth with marble steps leading up to it. A beautifully carved silver turtle sits on the floor facing the sanctorum or `garbha griha the marble floor around the silver turtle is embedded with hundreds of silver coins with donors’ names engraved on them. Similar coins are also inset in the walls of the temple. Peacocks adorn the temple walls, as they are believed to be the vehicle of Goddess Saraswati –the Goddess of Wisdom and consort of Lord Brahma. A small image of the milkmaid Gayatri flanks the four-faced image of Lord Brahma known as Chaumurti. The sanctuary has silver doors inside a carved marble gateway. Steps in a corner, lead to a small cave dedicated to Lord Shiva.

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